Review: Briefs:Close Encounters @ Leicester Square Spiegeltent

Reviewed by Charlotte White

Prepare to board the mothership and lift off as the Briefs boys are back from the future to send us a message we all need to hear…the future is more than bright and everything will be let’s say ‘fluffing’ fine. A night full of talent, laughter and whole lot of bare cheek.

If you’ve never seen Briefs before let me tell you it’s everything you want in a drag boylesque show and more! If you think it’s all strip teases and lip syncing you’d be wrong…these boys have so many other talents! Expect to be shook as they jump and flip across the stage before juggling, hula hooping and demonstrating some serious aerial skills.

The show was lead and directed by the fabulous Shivannah aka Fez Fa’anana and he brought the house down with his incredible sass and wit. He definitely knew how to get the audience going and kept us engaged throughout the performance. Ru Paul eat your heart out.

Some jaw dropping Aerial tricks were done by Captain Kidd and Thomas Worrell who span at dizzying speeds up in the air. Not only that, but Captain Kidd proved his hips don’t lie hula hooping several luminous hoops around his body seemingly effortlessly.

We saw…rather a lot of all the guys, but particularly Louis Biggs. He showed he can juggle an impressive amount of balls (juggling balls!) and without dropping any! Being the youngest, he stood out but also his performance was amazing to watch.

Harry Clayton-Wright performed a hilarious comedic dance duet with Brett Rosengreen who did a fantastic job of lifting Harry (dressed as the female) above his head. The facial expressions and emotion from Harry managed to portray a story in a comedic fashion which got the whole audience laughing and following along with them. Brett also had a solo which delivered a special message as each layer of clothing came off, a very powerful routine.

During the show a certain rabbit by the name of Dale Woodbridge-Brown would pop up and performed his special magic trick of making alarm clocks stop ringing. This develops in to a full out acrobatic dance number which incorporated the alarm clocks and he was definitely getting in to it giving a lively and animated performance with a lot of laughs.

 

 

You could certainly tell the audience were enjoying it and that there were some fans in the audience who were clearly familiar with Briefs. In fact the person I was sat next to explained this was his third visit. In all honesty I can see why it has such a following.

The lighting by Paul Lim and music by Busty Beatz set the tone of the show perfectly and really added to the spectacle of it.

Think Ru Paul meets Cirque du Soleil. Briefs: Close Encounters is a futuristic drag circus extravaganza with something to entertain everyone. If the future really is like this, there’s hope for us yet.

Catch Briefs: Close Encounters now at Leicester Square Spiegeltent until 3rd Jan 2019. Click here for information and tickets

 

4stars

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Review: R+J @ Access Theatre, NYC

Reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

In this modern retelling of a classic story where men are nowhere in sight. There is a museum of sorts that explains why men disappeared. But the focus of this play is on the women, so that’s what I’ll do too. The set of R+J can be described as industrial and hazardous (designed by Marisa Kaugars). Large sheets of metal are the backdrop of the scene and surround the entire performance area. The aggressive set was an accurate location for this retelling, filled with anger and passion, it is hard to imagine this version of R+J in a set any less dynamic. The warlike set is reflected in the conflict ready direction of the play.

R (Charlie Aleman) is charismatic. The show revolves around R, and they provide a strong emotional foundation for a show that at sometimes is frantic. Benvolio (Chelsea Fryer) and Mercutio (Ania Upstill) banter with R with ease, an emotional bond is clear, as the actors move forward with the plot. Perhaps I am placing my ideas of femineity on the actors and seeing traditionally male characters as more emotional because they are being portrayed by female presenting individuals. Each thought and conclusion I made during the show has me second guessing my biases.

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R+J’s costume design (designed by Lux Haac) deepens the dark nature of the play, and the set forces the audience to imagine a different world. The inherit masculinity in the black and camouflage costumes contrasts the femininity exhibited from the actors. Even traditionally female characters, such as J (Briana Sakamoto) are shrouded in black. Although her mesh shirt exuded female energy. On the other hand, the low cost but high intellect of the set creates an entirely masculine world. The Reflective properties of the metal sheets double the cast and the audience- eerily reflecting our confused and shocked expressions back onto ourselves.

My preconceived ideas lessen lust in a gay relationship, I was shocked when I found myself surprised that two female presenting individuals could be as lustful as R and J. My idea of the traditional play, my understanding of lust and sexual desire, had been dictated by societal norms. The kissing scenes and sex scenes in this production felt so strange to me because I hadn’t thought that queer love could descend into the same single-minded lust and passion that I have come to expect in a straight couple. I think subconsciously I had made assumptions, most that non-heteronormative relationships were lustless, or less lustful. I was tested by R + J and found wanting.

Shakespeares’ sex jokes feel weird, female-presenting individuals are talking about how hard their dicks are, and how they want to sleep with different women. The jokes become poignant. A reminder of how ridiculous and segregated our genders are. It seemed bizarre for a woman to make a joke, but it was just funny (to me) in other Romeo and Juliet productions. I think this is one of the many reasons this production is so revolutionary and relevant, it highlights internal sexism and forces me to confront my prejudices. These differences are mirrored in my response to the violence in the show. It feels overly violent, and I wondered while watching, would I have felt that way if it were two male presenting individuals fighting to the death?

It feels strange for J to wait for R to take action. In this retelling, there is no fairer sex, but J still waits. In previous shows I have seen it felt natural, Romeo will go organize the wedding while Juliet waits. But when there are two female presenting individuals, why should one wait for the other to take action? They are equal. I am mortified at myself, and my complacency. The power imbalance between Romeo and Juliet in classic telling’s of the show are increasingly obvious as I watch the classic story unfurl.

At the top of Act II the show began to drag a little. This does happen (in my opinion) in almost all Shakespeare plays, so it wasn’t too outside the ordinary. What was strange and unique to this production was the confusion caused by actors playing multiple roles, sometimes in the same scene. That was truly one of the most confusing aspects of the show.

R crying seems too feminine for the character as portrayed by a female presenting actor, and again this show puts my own notions of gender to shame, as I am faced with my deeply innate response to men crying, which is to perceive them as weak. R is described as “a child and a beast” and this stood out to me. During R + J, I was faced with a lot of confrontational ideas and this line stood out to me as powerful as it was a strong and reasonable way to define a man, but not a woman.

When J is found ‘dead’, there is a single light that follows her. J is found by R, and the long soliloquy begins. I never thought about how truly toxic R’s masculinity is until a gender non-conforming individual portrayed him and he was so clearly made to look ridiculous through his bravado and self-imposed masculinity. R takes the poison and violently throws up. My response to this was that it was accurate yet entirely melodramatic. J’s demise is powerful, touching and modern. The drama feels accurate to the text, and to Shakespeare, but with a female presenting individual in the role, it felt over the top.

I have seen countless retellings of this story, but never before have I been so surprised by my response to this well-known and well-loved story. I was moved, angered, and made to question myself throughout the show. Although confronting this show is worth seeing. It might not be what you want to hear, nobody likes discovering dark and ugly things about themselves. But I feel this show justly deserves a receptive audience.

4stars

 

 

Review: Precious Little Talent, Courtyard Theatre

Reviewed by Charlotte White

Produced by Blue Butterfly Productions and directed by Brock Elwick, Precious Little Talent is a story of belief, family and hope written by Ella Hickson. We start off at Christmas in New York and bright eyed 19 year old Sam spends the night with a 23 year old English girl named Joey. The next day Sam goes to work caring for George and who should be there but Joey. She hasn’t seen her father George in two years and can’t understand why he doesn’t answer a simple question.

As soon as the show starts the audience are addressed when Sam begins to narrate what is happening and what he is thinking during the scene. This was a very interesting use of the technique and I think it worked for the play and gave it more if a unique style.

Sam was played by Henry George Lewis and he truly was a joy to watch. His character was so vibrant, energetic and full of life and his comedy brought a touch of light to the piece which covers an otherwise fairly dark subject matter. He seemed very comfortable and at ease on stage.

The role of Joey was portrayed by Marta Kane and honestly I was moved by her performance. There was a genuine feel about it and she kept you gripped throughout.

The final cast member Mark Keegan was George and he seemed so deep in his character it was quite captivating. He gave a very convincing performance and kept with it throughout the whole show never breaking character, it seemed very believable.

Speaking for people who have some difficulty hearing, linking with our ‘Do we hear the people sing?’ section, occasionally the lighting could have been a bit brighter as some may have to rely on the visual cues/lip reading in order to follow it. At times when it was very dark when there was still dialogue going on which would have made it difficult for people to do this.

Overall the storyline was very touching and very poignant at this time as mental health is a big issue and I think this show encourages people to talk more openly about it. If we don’t, it means people are unaware and so can’t be there for help and support which is why shows like this are so important.

Precious Little Talent is playing at the Courtyard Theatre near Old Street, London until the 28th October. Click here for tickets.

4stars

Review: Pop Punk High @ (Le) Poisson Rouge, NYC

Reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

The show began with a standing crowd and no chairs (except some couches and a reserved section), not what one expects when heading to the theatre. And as the unconventional seats forewarned, Pop Punk High was no ordinary show. The evening I attended began with a band, Dude Ranch, singing and encouraging the audience to shout “DICK”. The band was loud, and I should have paid more attention when the merchandise stands outside the theatre had earplugs for sale. Despite the intense volume, Dude Ranch sufficiently warmed the audience, preparing them for the power of pop-punk music. 

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The show began in earnest with the protagonist, Derek (Ben Lapidus) yelling at his parents (Mclean Peterson and Eric Wiegand), telling them he hates them. Which seemed odd to me, as I have a deep respect and love for my parents. Little was I to know how clever the foreshadowing was in this overtly silly show. The cleverness of this show, as a form of self-deprivation, is unfortunately overshadowed by the loudness of the dated music.

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While describing the evolution of pop-punk, Tib (Amanda Centeno) states that pop-punk was created by “tak(ing) out the nuance, and leav(ing) the power cord”. How accurate she was. Although moving at times, this show pandered to a specific niche music fan. Despite that, the hilarious show remains nostalgic, if sometimes a bit silly. And Tib’s charisma and charm help elevate the show.

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The crux of the story is that Derrick, a loser with a needledick, sprays a magic axe bottle, releasing a dead Avril Lavigne (Kelly Krauter), who offers Derek 3 wishes. The ridiculous wishes come as no surprise, despite its predictability the wishes nicely foreshadow the outcome of the show. The story itself is whimsical, and at some times thin, logic crumbles under narrative pressure.

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The pacing of the show and the quality of the songs were excellent. The songs meaningfully moved the story forward, providing excellent rhythm for the show. The ensemble continuously sang and danced their hearts out. It was the first time I asked myself what the true meaning of punk-pop was. And I’m surprised a show with such an airy story managed to perfectly provide me with a deep existential question. This show climaxes with a giant dick knocking over the antagonist. Despite that, the evening was enjoyable.

Niched, fun and a bit rude, this silly show will fulfil your 2003 self’s dreams. With all the ups and downs of the show, it creates a positive atmosphere for growth and excitement. I felt empowered as the cast took their bows, to be the best version of myself.

3-stars

Pop Punk High is currently playing at (Le) Poisson Rouge until November 1st, tickets can be purchased here

Review: Six @ The Arts Theatre, London

Reviewed by Charlotte White

When I was younger, my little self was absolutely obsessed with the Tudors, to the point where I would practically force people to quiz me on them. Now, the incredibly talented Toby Marlow and Lucy Moss have written something that combines my two loves of Musical theatre and the Tudors in the form of Six the Musical! Telling the tale of Henry VIIIs six wives like you’ve never heard it before. If you think you know all there is to know about these amazing women who happened to catch the eye of one particular man, these girls are about to give you a lesson in ‘herstory’.

After a sold out run at the arts theatre earlier this year and taking the Edinburgh fringe by storm this year, Six is back on tour and we managed to catch it on it’s return to the Arts theatre in London. Directed by Jamie Armitage and Lucy Moss, Six is a 75 minute one act pop tudor extravaganza. The premise of the show being the wives are in competition with each other to see who had it worse from their large short tempered husband King Henry. So we here from them all as they tell their own versions of what happened all those years ago, in the stylings of pop icons such as Beyoncé, Adele, Rihanna and more! There’s something to suit every taste.

To start with we have Jarneia Richard-Noel as the first wife, Catherine of Aragon as she impresses the audience with her sassy number and riffs to ‘ruffle your ruffs’.

Millie O’Connell puts her own stamp on Henry’s second wife Anne Boleyn with hilarious one liners (mainly attempting to remind us about the unfortunate loss of her head) and a quirky rock song that is definitely one to make you want to get up and rock along with her.

The third wife, his supposed true love, Jane Seymour is played by Natalie Paris who tugs on your heart strings with an emotional ballad and breath taking vocals.

 

Alexia McIntosh causes a sensation as Anna of Cleves performing a sexy Nicky Minaj style number encouraging the audience to ‘get down’ with the German princess and party Tudor style.

The second of the three Catherines and fifth wife overall is the young, promiscuous Catherine Howard and Aimie Atkinson kicks it up a notch with a killer, upbeat, pop song. Aimie gives an amazing performance and delivers 100% full out on emotion and vocally.

With five down, we come to the final wife, Catherine Parr. Maiya Quansah-Breed is stunning on stage and reminds us there’s is so much more to the story then some people may realise.

The show is so cleverly thought out by co-creators Marlow and Moss and the lighting and choreography by Carrie-Anne Ingrouille and Tim Deiling really help to bring the show together. All of the songs are so catchy and well written you’re bound to want to have the soundtrack on repeat 24/7 after watching. The whole piece is performed with such energy from start to finish and the cast work so well on stage, hitting every move and note to get those beautiful harmonies.

There is No way you’re not going to lose your head over Six. Some might say you would have a heart of stone if you didn’t at least enjoy it a little. So come on and get down like it’s 1499 because after all it’s all you’re gonna want to do after seeing this show, and it definitely is deserving of your love.

5stars

Six runs at the Arts Theatre until the 14th October after which it will tour to Kingston, Southampton, Salford and Glasgow.  For tickets and more information please visit the Six website 

Review: Gypsy @ Theatre Royal, Winchester

Reviewed by Charlotte White

I was pleasantly surprised by RicNic Hampshire’s production of Gypsy. The entire production was put on by 16-21 year olds and I have to say the standard was actually very high! Knowing the general premise of the show, I was intrigued to see how it would be played and they delivered with talent and just a dash of star quality.

Directed by Emily Pacey, Gypsy transports us to 1920s Vaudeville and is the story of Rose who is determined to make her daughters stars! Trying to live vicariously through her children, Rose risks everything to ensure their fame, however it doesn’t quite go to plan.

A few understudies were on, so the leading role of ultimate stage mum Rose was played by Ali Shepherd. It’s quite a mature character to play, but she certainly pulled it off in my books. She performed it with such passion and vocally her numbers were fantastic. I was very captivated by her performance and the emotion she put across.

Jack Shannon who played talent agent Herbie seemed to connect to his character well and to the others on stage. It was a very natural performance and the ease with which he acted from start to finish.

Poppy Hill certainly oozed a certain amount of star quality as both Baby June and Dainty June with her charming smile, impressive voice and high kicks. The part seemed to suit her well and her performance was very enjoyable. The term ‘triple threat’ comes to mind when thinking about her portrayal as she showcased all aspects of her talent.

The role of Louise was taken by Charlotte Teschner and she absolutely shone for the entirety of the performance. The character progressed and developed a lot as the show went on, and she portrayed each change very well. It was almost like seeing a completely new person form. There was a very engaging quality about her and she commanded the stage like a professional.

 

 

One of the comedic highlights of the second act has to be Nathan Deane as stage manager Pastey. Every line was delivered with purpose, the characterisation was spot on and the comedy timing was just right. He seemed to completely transform in to that character and his energy stood out to me multiple times throughout the show. Clara Wessley also got a lot of laughs as Miss Cratchitt, again nailing the comedy aspect and was a very amusing character. Great job by Miss Wessley.

The three burlesque dancers Tessie Tura, Mazeppa and Electra played by Bethany Williams, Becki Holder and Beth-Anne Hollyhurst respectively  added yet more hilarity to the show. They definitely looked liked they had fun with the roles and their number was very enjoyable, their voices went really nicely together.

Overall, I was very impressed with the level of professionalism and energy shown by the whole cast. The costumes and staging of the production was also very impressive. It definitely helped capture the time period. Filled with musical classics and a winning storyline with such a variety of emotions, it was a thoroughly enjoyable show. I would definitely recommend RicNic productions for the future, great showcase of young talent.

 

4stars

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5 ways traveling makes me a better theatregoer

by Annie Zeleznikow

If you follow me on Instagram (which you all should @_anniedaynow_) you might have noticed that I am traveling through Europe. Through numerous train journeys and countless cinema-going experiences outside of the English-speaking world, I feel I have gained new insight into extracting and enjoying the most from my theatre experience. I wanted to share these new insights with you, dear reader. Going to new places and exposing yourself to foreign cultures enriches one’s understanding of themselves, the world, and THEATRE. Travelling is marvelous, as is theatre; and both are deserving of your time and attention.

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  1. Be courteous of others and they will do the same. Show respect to others, and if something goes wrong, you are in it together. You’ll help each other out. if you freak out because you don’t speak German and you’re afraid you’re heading towards Russia, ask for some help from a fellow passenger, usually, they are willing to help a sobbing 20-something-year-old.
  2. Wear what makes you feel comfortable. When traveling, I would mostly wear yoga pants and trainers. And do you know who cared? No one. It was comfortable and able to do the task at hand- fall asleep on public transport. If your nervous about what to wear to a Broadway show, wear whatever makes you comfortable, or whatever feels best for the occasion. I have seen heaps of people rock Potter wear to Cursed Child, and they are all killing it.
  3. If you don’t understand what is going on, just lean into it. Someone will explain it afterward if you remember to ask. Just enjoy what is happening around you right now, everything else will follow.
  4. Take time to close your eyes. Although I loved watching the French countryside roll by, sometimes I need a rest from the overload of stimulus. Often big production shows can be overwhelming, and demand attention from all your sense. I try to close my eyes if the songs are particularly sweet, and I want to focus on the vocals.
  5. Do what makes you happy! All experiences are your own- and this summer I’ve tried to take upon myself only tasks that make me happy. The same goes for theatre! I’ve seen some shows multiple times, and although its costly, and I am not widening my musical repertoire, those shows make me happy. And I get something new and exciting from the same show each time I see it.

Review: Laura Bush Killed a Guy @ The Flea Theatre, NYC

reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

I was welcomed into the theatre with an offer of a pen and a cowboy cookie. Delighted, I took my seat and was surprised to find two things. One, this was a one-woman show with no intermission and Two, my uncultured assumption that Laura was one of the Bush twins was wrong. I was surprised to find a well-groomed older woman, George W. Bush’s wife Laura.

Munching on my cookie, Laura (or First Lady Bush, or Mrs. Bush now I guess) began sharing her renowned Cowboy Cookie recipe in detail. This long monologue bookended the show, Laura used her recipe as a method of connection with America, and on a smaller scale with our audience. The mirroring of her words continues throughout the show if I paid close attention I could see the dual image Lisa Hodsoll was creating in her portrayal of the First Lady.

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Hodsoll’s engaging and thrilling storytelling captured the small audience. Ian Allan used carefully crafted words to paint a specific image of Laura Bush. Laura’s story was told as though to a friend, with whom she was happy to lie to. Halfway through the show, Laura retold an earlier story, with different motives around the accident. My personal feelings of betrayal shocked me. Hodsoll had made me her friend, only to tell me she had been lying the whole time. This dualism of Laura added both suspense and intrigue to the show. Hodsoll had my full attention.

Laura tells two stories about an orphanage. She went once with her parents, and she went once with George. This reflection of events provokes powerful emotions and was successful in engaging me in meaningful thought about the Bush family, something I had thought impossible. Laura speaks about visiting countries in the Middle East, and how the weight of a Burka surprised her. Hearing stories of Laura trying new things and opening up her world to new experiences impressed me. In light of modern politics, this show cleverly introduced a more sympathetic woman than I would have suspected.

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Laura tells two stories about how she met George. At this point, I’m not sure what to believe. I’m not sure if it matters which story is true or accurate. The emotions a felt in response to each story was real for me. Although jarring, I found this show thought-provoking and engaging. The atmosphere was electric and like a true politician, Hodsoll had me eating out of the palm of her hand.

3-stars

Review: Heathers @ The Other Palace

Reviewed by Charlotte White

When I managed to get a must have ticket to Heathers I was extremely happy. Of course I had heard of this show but I didn’t know much about it at all, so I went in to it with a very open mind.

For anyone who is also unfamiliar with the plot of Heathers, it’s the story of Heather Chandler, Heather McNamara, Heather Duke and Veronica Sawyer. As a student of Westerburg high life is difficult for Veronica, but not for the Heathers. So Veronica decides to make a deal with the Heathers to become popular. This new friendship seems to be going well, that is until new kid on the block Jason ‘JD’ Dean gets involved and things start to unravel from there.

Directed by Andy Fickman, the hugely talented cast put on quite the show. Starting with the leading role of Veronica, Carrie Hope Fletcher gave a gripping performance. After seeing her in Les Miserables as Eponine, this character was quite different and allowed the audience to see a different side to her. Carrie’s voice was certainly strong enough for the role and her portrayal of the character was everything you’d want as a ‘newbie’ watching the show- enticing, emotional and humorous. I enjoyed the comedic side to her performance and it seems the rest of the audience did too. I felt a sense of pride as I watched her and that she too felt proud of the role, exuding body confidence and empowerment to all us young women out there.

The three iconic Heathers played by Jodie Steele (Heather Chandler), Sophie Isaacs (Heather McNamara) and T’shan Williams (Heather Duke) did not disappoint. Their vocals worked extremely well together and all three seemed to have a good connection on stage. I feel Jodie really came into her own in this role and the two solos by T’Shan and Sophie were both performed brilliantly. They all nailed the comedy but also the emotion of the piece as well.

I was utterly captivated by Jamie Muscato as Jason Dean. He gave such a compelling performance throughout the entirety of the show, but I loved how the character developed as it went on. He was convincing the whole way through and I thoroughly enjoyed his interpretation of the role.

Jenny O’Leary gave such a touching performance as Veronica’s best friend Martha Dunnstock and Rebecca Lock was fabulous as Ms Flemming! Dominic Andersen and Chris Chung played the rather comedic duo of Ram Sweeney and Kurt Kelly. They gave the show a lighter feel and had me laughing the whole way through.

As I was new to the show (unlike the several ‘Heather Chandlers’ in the audience who were clearly familiar with it), I had nothing to compare it to. Perhaps some hardcore fans may not agree with all the decisions made but I thoroughly enjoyed it. There is quite a hype surrounding the show so I think it is good to come in with an open mind as there is a new song and new staging. Also, there are some very adult/dark themes explored during the show so it may not be for everyone. Having said this, I think it is done in a tasteful and fairly lighthearted way.

Did I hear the people sing? The Other Palace is quite a small venue which helped, but the cast were excellent in their diction and clarity both during their songs and dialogue. The volume was a comfortable level and I had no trouble at all hearing what was going on.

In summary, Heathers is a sexy, twisted, seductive tale that will give you a rush which is likely to ‘Freeze Your Brain’. Combine this with a soundtrack you’re bound to be singing for days on end after you leave, it’s a winner in my opinion. Even if you’re a bit unsure, try and grab a ticket if one comes up. I myself was quite surprised I liked it so much, I guess you could colour me stoked.

5stars

REVIEW: Island Song @ Davenport Theatre Loft, NYC

reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

All Things Broadway, a much beloved Facebook group, presented their first full-length show. The theatre was filled with family, friends and supportive theatre lovers. One of the producers, Eliyahu Kheel, addressed the audience, explaining in a short and heartwarming way the long road that lead to this production.

Island Song presents the overlapping lives of serval busy New Yorkers. The story follows 5 core characters, with actors doubling up to play minor characters. The show offered many opportunities to show off the actors’ vocal range, to my delight. The songs that bookend the show rang out through the theatre with the strong harmonies of a powerful cast.

The staging was interesting and the director, Keira Todd, impressively utilized the space and light of the Loft. The lighting stood out, as the twinkle lights around the room pulsed in time with the emotions and climax of each song. The small theatre space created an intimate atmosphere, and the show felt tailored uniquely for me. Focusing on romance and making it in the big city, the themes of the show resonated with me.

Each of the 5 characters struggled with living in the city and found strength in different ways. The pop songs illustrated the nuanced issues the characters were facing. Will (Mathew Billman) charismatically courted his girl-next-door, Jordan (Stephanie Michele Toups), and Shoshana (Kira Leiva) was just looking for love in all the wrong places. Caroline (Anna Harris) struggled with a purpose. The standout, however, was Cooper (Darren Cementina) who, through his story as a struggling artist, managed to give me goosebumps with his superb vocals.

Although there was a dense amount of songs, and there were some technical issues with the microphones, this show was undoubtedly heartwarming. The community produced show is representative of the great artistic creativity that can be produced with the faith and support of loved ones. Empowering and touching, this production showed me how much heart can be woven into a single show.

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