Review: Pop Punk High @ (Le) Poisson Rouge, NYC

Reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

The show began with a standing crowd and no chairs (except some couches and a reserved section), not what one expects when heading to the theatre. And as the unconventional seats forewarned, Pop Punk High was no ordinary show. The evening I attended began with a band, Dude Ranch, singing and encouraging the audience to shout “DICK”. The band was loud, and I should have paid more attention when the merchandise stands outside the theatre had earplugs for sale. Despite the intense volume, Dude Ranch sufficiently warmed the audience, preparing them for the power of pop-punk music. 

PopPunk8065_OliviaHern.jpg

The show began in earnest with the protagonist, Derek (Ben Lapidus) yelling at his parents (Mclean Peterson and Eric Wiegand), telling them he hates them. Which seemed odd to me, as I have a deep respect and love for my parents. Little was I to know how clever the foreshadowing was in this overtly silly show. The cleverness of this show, as a form of self-deprivation, is unfortunately overshadowed by the loudness of the dated music.

PopPunk8541_OliviaHern

While describing the evolution of pop-punk, Tib (Amanda Centeno) states that pop-punk was created by “tak(ing) out the nuance, and leav(ing) the power cord”. How accurate she was. Although moving at times, this show pandered to a specific niche music fan. Despite that, the hilarious show remains nostalgic, if sometimes a bit silly. And Tib’s charisma and charm help elevate the show.

PopPunk7941_OliviaHern.jpg

The crux of the story is that Derrick, a loser with a needledick, sprays a magic axe bottle, releasing a dead Avril Lavigne (Kelly Krauter), who offers Derek 3 wishes. The ridiculous wishes come as no surprise, despite its predictability the wishes nicely foreshadow the outcome of the show. The story itself is whimsical, and at some times thin, logic crumbles under narrative pressure.

PopPunk8061_OliviaHern.JPG

The pacing of the show and the quality of the songs were excellent. The songs meaningfully moved the story forward, providing excellent rhythm for the show. The ensemble continuously sang and danced their hearts out. It was the first time I asked myself what the true meaning of punk-pop was. And I’m surprised a show with such an airy story managed to perfectly provide me with a deep existential question. This show climaxes with a giant dick knocking over the antagonist. Despite that, the evening was enjoyable.

Niched, fun and a bit rude, this silly show will fulfil your 2003 self’s dreams. With all the ups and downs of the show, it creates a positive atmosphere for growth and excitement. I felt empowered as the cast took their bows, to be the best version of myself.

3-stars

Pop Punk High is currently playing at (Le) Poisson Rouge until November 1st, tickets can be purchased here

Advertisements

In Conversation With: JILL SANTORIELLO (It Happened In Key West)

Jill Santoriello is a writer, composer and lyricist whose newest musical, It Happened In Key West, has recently opened in London at the Charing Cross Theatre. Santoriello also penned the award-winning musical adaptation of Dickens’ “A Tale of Two Cities”. It Happens In Key West tells the story of Carl Tanzler, an eccentric German man living in Key West, Florida, in the thirties, who was found living with the body of Elena Hoyos, his true love but also a young woman who passed away seven years earlier.

Read my five-star review of It Happened In Key West here. 

What interested you about the story of Carl Tanzler and writing a Carl Tanzler musical?

I had never heard of this story until my producer and collaborator, Jeremiah James, pitched me the idea several years ago. It immediately appealed to me in an over-the-top gothic romantic sort of way. Jeremiah was familiar with my work on “A Tale of Two Cities” so I knew he had to be envisioning a musical that was somewhat romantic as well. But he couldn’t have known that I also have a slightly twisted, dark, demented side that was just as drawn to the potential for black comedy as it was drawn to the grand romance. The good news was Jeremiah didn’t want the show to be all one thing or the other either. We shared the view that as romantic and sincere as Carl’s intentions may have been, keeping and preserving a decaying body around the house just had to present certain challenges that were ripe for comedy.

Why did you choose to portray Tanzler as a romantic rather than a psychotic body-snatcher as many have?

Jeremiah, Jason Huza (co-book writer) and I were never interested in doing a dark, grisly horror story. That’s just not how we saw it, though it can be interpreted that way and has been portrayed that way in other versions of the story. But that’s what appealed to us frankly – taking what some people thought they knew – a creepy tale of body-snatching and obsession – and turning it into a silly, absurd, uplifting romance. We made a choice early on to take Carl at his word and tell the story from his point of view. And actually, his accounts were not greatly contradicted by the newspaper and legal accounts of the time, so he seemed to be the most reliable first-hand narrator for the show. And he literally ends his diary with the most optimistic, adoring words of gratitude for having known Elena and having had the honour of taking care of her as long as he did. So, when you read that, it’s kind of hard to not appreciate the romantic side of him and what he did. And it’s impossible to deny that this man truly loved this woman – as they say – to the bitter end.

What were the most challenging parts of the true story to adapt to fit the style of the musical?

Well even though Carl wrote a rather detailed diary account of the events, they didn’t automatically “sing” or lend themselves to being dramatized. In fact, sometimes his notes were a little too scientifically detailed and clinical, so we did take our fair share of dramatic license, inventing some scenes and conflicts as needed. The hardest (and most fun) part of writing a show like this is figuring out what to approach as heartfelt and what to approach tongue-in-cheek through the dark comedy filter.

Whilst researching for the musical, did you meet anyone who was around in Key West when the discovery was made?

It’s funny that you ask that because my collaborators actually met a woman in Key West who was alive at the time that Carl was discovered living with Elena’s body. So this person literally attended Elena’s second wake and viewing in 1940 when she was a little girl. They had a long conversation with this woman, whose mother was best friends with Elena, and the amazing thing was she literally corroborated our “imagined” version of events! In other words, we had written scenes where Elena showed that she really cared for Carl whilst she was alive, loved him and asked him to take care of her body when she passed away – and this woman told us that yes she did. And also that the people of Key West, people who actually knew them, saw the story exactly the way that we saw it – not as something creepy or horrible but as an expression of how much this man loved this woman and the lengths he went to to keep his promise to her. I was particularly touched by the fact that when the song “Undying Love” was played for this lady, she actually broke down weeping because she said it was how they all felt about the story.

Are there any other true crime stories you’d like to adapt to the stage?

Honestly, I never thought of this as much of a crime. I mean, the charges against him were grave robbing and desecration of a tomb. Well, he had paid for Elena’s funeral, paid for and built the mausoleum that she was kept in – all with the consent of her family. And if you happen to believe in an afterlife and spirit communication, which I do, if the dead girl you love comes to you from beyond the grave and asks you to get her out of the cemetery and take her home with you, well what else are you supposed to do? So where’s the crime in that? You can question whether he was delusional to think he’d been visited by a spirit – but no-one who knew him ever doubted he believed that to be the case. So I believe he truly thought he was honouring Elena’s wishes and I can’t fault him for that.

Where would you ideally like to stage It Happened In Key West in the future?

London has been great and it’s my favourite place on the planet so this has been a wonderful experience premiering the show here. And I’m definitely planning on coming back again on coming back again before the end of the run. But I would love to see it done in the U.S as well: in New York (where I live), of course, and especially in Florida and/or Key West. I think the story of undying love and how tough it is to say goodbye is pretty universal so I’m hopeful we’ll eventually find an audience in many places.

2

I’d like to really thank Jill Santoriello for agreeing to be interviewed. You can find more information about her as a writer and her shows here. 

It Happens In Key West runs at the Charing Cross Theatre in London until the 18th of August 2018. Tickets and more information can be found here. 

REVIEW: It Happened In Key West @ Charing Cross Theatre

Reviewed by Nathan Deane

A classic love story that involves forbidden lovers, tuberculosis, and grave-robbing. Honestly, what’s not to love?

It Happened In Key West tells the very true story of “Count” Carl Tanzler, a German man who lived as a doctor in Key West, Florida in the 1930’s. He had said that when he was a young boy, he dreamed of a girl that would be the woman he marries. He finds that in Key West in the form of Elena Hoyos, but ends up diagnosing her with tuberculosis. She is already married, but he showers her with gifts (and even proposes, to which she declines). When she eventually dies, he builds a mausoleum for her and eventually…steals her body and lives with it. For seven years.

Not traditional musical theatre inspiration, and being familiar with the story before seeing the show means I was extremely intrigued to how they’d pull it off.

Penning the book, music and lyrics, Jill Santoriello does her best to turn the macabre true story into a beautiful romance. The music is lush, with extremely clever lyrics and a book that turns Tanzler into a wisecracking romantic. Santoriello twists some truths of the story to play in favour of romance (I particularly liked the changing of Tanzler dragging Elena’s corpse out of the cemetery in a toy wagon to a variety of different ghosts and spirits marrying them in the graveyard).  In the true court case, Tanzler was medically proven sane. The book does its best to show that he wasn’t crazy, and it worked. There were moments which I found myself tearing up, which was a change from most versions of the story where they try to make Tanzler look like a psycho.

Marc Robin‘s direction and minimal choreography worked for the small stage of the Charing Cross theatre. Wooden crates were moved and stacked to create locations, aided by projections designed by Louise Rhoades-Brown.

Wade McCollum takes on the role of Carl. His comical, yet creepy, performance was perfect. He plays Carl from the moment he first meets Elena up to the day he dies, which McCollum plays wonderfully. In particular, his act one solo “Undying Love” was beautifully done.

Playing Elena Hoyos, both dead and alive, is Alyssa Martin. The innocence of Elena was shown perfectly in both acts, firstly accepting Carl to try and “cure her tuberculosis” (there was no cure for TB at the time), and in act two as a dead woman, singing beautifully “I Feel Loved”.

It Happened In Key West is definitely a musical to suit all tastes, from the classic musical theatre vibe of the score to the macabre but comic book. It’ll be hard to find a better new musical comedy this year.

5stars

IT HAPPENED IN KEY WEST runs at the Charing Cross Theatre until 18th August. Tickets and more information here.

REVIEW: The Producers @ Ferneham Hall

Reviewed by Nathan Deane

The Producers is an iconic comedy musical based off of the 1969 film of the same name written by Mel Brooks. South Downe Musical Society have returned to Ferneham Hall in Fareham to tackle the challenge of producing the over the top, lavish musical written by Brooks himself.

The Producers tells the story of Max Bialystock and Leo Bloom, two theatre producers scheming to produce “the worst show ever written” and take all the money and travel to Rio. However, the show they produce, Springtime For Hitler, is ultimately a success and the fraudsters are caught out.

Taking the roles of Bialystock and Bloom are Matt Sackman and Sam Townsend. Sackman was excellent as Bialystock, a scheming ex-King of Broadway. Sackman is funny in the role, and his act two solo “Betrayed” was a highlight of the show. Townsend was perfectly cast as Leo Bloom, giving an awkwardly cute performance with lush vocals and comedic delivery of lines.

Director Jane Pegler had a tough job of bringing the book and music to life without copying too much from the film or previous productions of the show. And whilst I did see some similarities between the movie, Pegler did her best to keep the staging fresh and inventive.

The standout performance of the night goes to Kimberley Harvey as Ulla. An extremely funny performance, with strong vocals and a convincing Swedish accent throughout.

It was a shame that the sound levels weren’t balanced properly as the ensemble often seemed to be drowned out by the pitch-perfect orchestra (who were West End standard, may I add.)

The Producers was a great night out guaranteed to entertain anyone from die-hard theatre lovers to die-hard Mel Brooks fans.

4stars

REVIEW: Island Song @ Davenport Theatre Loft, NYC

reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

All Things Broadway, a much beloved Facebook group, presented their first full-length show. The theatre was filled with family, friends and supportive theatre lovers. One of the producers, Eliyahu Kheel, addressed the audience, explaining in a short and heartwarming way the long road that lead to this production.

Island Song presents the overlapping lives of serval busy New Yorkers. The story follows 5 core characters, with actors doubling up to play minor characters. The show offered many opportunities to show off the actors’ vocal range, to my delight. The songs that bookend the show rang out through the theatre with the strong harmonies of a powerful cast.

The staging was interesting and the director, Keira Todd, impressively utilized the space and light of the Loft. The lighting stood out, as the twinkle lights around the room pulsed in time with the emotions and climax of each song. The small theatre space created an intimate atmosphere, and the show felt tailored uniquely for me. Focusing on romance and making it in the big city, the themes of the show resonated with me.

Each of the 5 characters struggled with living in the city and found strength in different ways. The pop songs illustrated the nuanced issues the characters were facing. Will (Mathew Billman) charismatically courted his girl-next-door, Jordan (Stephanie Michele Toups), and Shoshana (Kira Leiva) was just looking for love in all the wrong places. Caroline (Anna Harris) struggled with a purpose. The standout, however, was Cooper (Darren Cementina) who, through his story as a struggling artist, managed to give me goosebumps with his superb vocals.

Although there was a dense amount of songs, and there were some technical issues with the microphones, this show was undoubtedly heartwarming. The community produced show is representative of the great artistic creativity that can be produced with the faith and support of loved ones. Empowering and touching, this production showed me how much heart can be woven into a single show.

3-stars20180619_212412

Do you HEAR the people sing?

Written by Charlie White

So, I recently went to the theatre and unfortunately…I struggled to pick up the dialogue and therefore missed parts of the story. This wasn’t helped by the fact that the actors didn’t wear mics (as it was a play) and they had extremely strong accents. This then sparked the idea for a blog focusing on the sound/hearing aspect of shows.

I myself am a hearing aid wearer and have had problems with my ears since being a child, so this is quite an important subject to me (especially when it comes to hearing in a theatre) as I’m sure it is to most theatregoers.

The majority of the time, most shows are pretty good at making sure things are at a suitable volume and of course there is the well know lesson of projection and ‘making sure your voice hits the back of the theatre’ (I assume…is this still a thing now?)

However, there are times when maybe the music can be a little overpowering or perhaps the characters might be deep in conversation and you can’t quite catch everything they are saying.

If any of you reading this are familiar with hearing aids or anything along those lines you’ll know most theatres now have what’s called the loop system, which if your hearing aid has it activated you can connect to it and the sound will be sent straight through to your hearing aid (I’m also an Audiologist so fit hearing aids for a living).

 

 

 

Some of the shows I’ve seen recently have varied a lot hearing wise. Firstly, the Ferryman. As much I loved the show and was extremely shocked by the ending (you have to be there), I did have a bit of trouble hearing it all. Yes, this is the play I mentioned at the beginning and I’m afraid I did struggle at times to understand what was being said. Despite this, you do get used to it by the end and I managed to follow the gist of it. My advice if you’re going to watch this is maybe trying to have a little idea of what it is about beforehand and have your concentrating caps on when you see it!

Another show I recently saw was the Cursed Child. I am pleased to say most of the actors in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child spoke very clearly and the sound was pretty good throughout the show! Occasionally if the characters were having an argument or got a bit carried away with emotion certain things might not come across quite so clearly.

Overall, musicals tend to be at an appropriate level in order for us to take in the beautiful scores or talented voices so generally, I’m sure a lot of people will manage fine. For those who do not or those who are interested in knowing a bit more about this side of things, there will be a short section on the sound/hearing quality included in our upcoming reviews. The aim is to hopefully help and guide people who may struggle so they know what to expect when going to see a particular show. So please keep an eye out for that in the future and be sure to hear the people sing!

REVIEW: SeatPlan

Written by Nathan Deane
Contributions from Charlotte White

A useful tool for UK theatregoers, SeatPlan is a website that takes the average auditorium plan and makes it interactive, allowing users to add photos from the seats and leave reviews of their seats. Users earn rewards from each photo uploaded and can also enter competitions and buy tickets via the website.

Despite a quite confusing interface, the tool is extremely helpful to the average theatregoer, if you’re based in London, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Milton Keynes, Manchester or Oxford. Whilst SeatPlan isn’t limited to those 6 areas, it doesn’t go much further than them, leaving people outside of those areas with local touring theatres in the dark of where to sit.

The site only has the major theatres, so you can’t get seating maps for some Off-West End venues such as Southwark Playhouse or Greenwich Theatre, which limits the usage to some theatre-goers.

The rewards are enticing, you earn 40p for each photo you add to the site and the pennies go towards theatre tokens – an exciting reward for any theatre fan. For an extra 40p, make sure you take a photo of your ticket stub!

The new, updated interface makes it hard to find the interactive seat plan, a feature I couldn’t find and had to ask my Facebook friends to help me find it when the update happened. Nevertheless, now I know where it is I can use the tool whenever I want.

The seat reviews are informative, usually accompanied by photos of the view and star ratings of the comfort, view, legroom and the show itself, providing a deep enough insight so that when you book your ticket you’ll know whether the seat is right for you.

The ticket booking system is easy enough, with discounted prices scattered around and easy to use seating charts.

I use the SeatPlan site quite frequently and, although it has a few minor issues, it’s a brilliant tool that anyone who is able to access a London theatre should use, and with the rewards system it’s a great way to fund your theatre-going!

4stars

REVIEW: Ms. Estrada @ The Flea Theatre

Reviewed by Annie Zeleznikow

The Flea Theatre that houses this production can be found off the beaten path in Tribeca, in a twist of oxymoronic fate this company is creating edgy and thought-provoking shows in the heart of the industrial upper class. This funky company introduced themselves by providing single pieces of paper, rather than a playbill. It was announced before the show began that this was a deliberate decision and that all other information can be found online. Their dedication to conservation is an interesting and thoughtful act towards global sustainability.

The show began with a disclaimer from the writers,The Q Brothers Collective. They astutely noted that they were all male, some gay, some of colour. The sensitive themes explored in Ms Estrada warranted the warning. The cleverly written prose professed profanity, and ultimately set the scene for a production that challenges and entertains.

Another visual that struck me before the show began was the DJ, Marguerite Frarey. Rather than having an orchestra, Ms Estrada had a band of one. Frarey would often shout and boo as the story developed. She was the first character you meet, and she remains a constant throughout. Frarey at times could be compared to an all mighty presence, watching the events of the show unfurl.

Ms Estrada focuses on a young woman’s experience through college. Written with dark humour and a clever sense of self-awareness, Liz Estrada (Malena Pennycook), a new college student, seeks the “power to change the system”. In an attempt to prevent the “Greek Games”, a sexist male competition focused on stereotypical frat games, Estrada convinces her fellow female classmates to withhold sex. With the support of her roommates and mentor (Jenna Krasowski), Estrada shows the Dean (Ben Schrager) how damaging the Greek Games are.

The songs in Ms Estrada are clever and catchy. With a flair for rap, the show slowly moves towards more traditionally female musical genres as the story progresses. “Ring the Bell” is a catchy earworm, as Estrada and the female rebels reprise the song whenever they are confronted. Estrada and her empowered peers rename themselves “Womxn with an X”, and flaunt their feminine power with some complex and intricate choreography. The boys begin losing matches and they complain to the Dean with a song that appears to find inspiration from Lin-Manuel Miranda and Macklemore. The show continues with a compelling blend of rap and pop.

Estrada’s compelling fight against an unrelenting torrent of sexism is remanent of Rob Thomas’ Veronica Mars. Young women are fighting for equality, and the stories focus on the struggle and success of these women. The storytelling and incorporation of Ms Estrada exudes a quirkiness similar to that of the charming Veronica Mars.

This masterful adaptation of the Greek Classic Lysistrata brings modern life to an ancient play. The in-house ensemble of The Flea Theater, The Bats, shine in this complex and captivating show.

4stars

Ms Estrada is playing at The Flea Theater until 28th April. You can buy tickets here

 

The Rockstar Experience: Jesus Christ Superstar Live

Written By Annie Zeleznikow

I had bought special students tickets to a show on at the public theatre. I didn’t know what they were for, it seemed interesting enough and I sure it would be a fun afternoon. But as soon as I got an email in my inbox about Jesus Christ Superstar Live I sent my friend a Facebook message:

Screen Shot 2018-04-03 at 2.31.56 pm

And of course, we decided to go to JCSS.

The first time I saw JCSS my older sister was dressed as a risqué maid, and there were chain-linked fences on stage. Surprising as it seems, the grunge of this university production wasn’t far off from the progressive and powerfully produced show that NBC aired on Easter Sunday.

I was assigned priority standing room. This meant that I was going to be on my feet from 4.30pm until about 10.30pm when the show ended. My friend was celebrating her birthday, so there was no way I was taking anyone else. We had a lot of time to chat and talk about our expectations and how we had been since we last saw each other. We also had lots of time to hype up the show we were about to witness.

It was a long journey from our home on the Upper West Side to the heart of Brooklyn. From a fabulous location in Brooklyn, the audience was transported via bus to Williamsburg. There I was meet with a strange sense of irony, as we elevated Christ in the heart of a large Jewish community. I was somewhat embarrassed to be celebrating Christ on the second day of Passover (which I had celebrated the night before), but my love of Theatre overwhelmingly won out.

The show began with the gorgeous and youthful Brandon Niederauer rocking out on his electric guitar among the scaffolding and fellow musicians. With one minute to go, I waved frantically at Neiderauer, sending forth my best wishes to him and the cast. Ensemble members crouched down in front of us, and we all started chanting in an attempt to prove that we were going to be an amazing audience.

Brandon Niederauer JCSS

The show begins with the ensemble, draped in black and grey clothing, crowding around our Jesus, John Legend. Legend emerges on the stage bathed in light, his gentle features Christ-like in the flood of brightness against the post-apocalyptic backdrop of our Jerusalem. Just as Andrew Lloyd Webber and Tim Rice would have wanted, the crowd, including me, screamed at the opportunity to reach out and touch Legends’ hand. This sort of response was evoked whenever Legend sang and derived from a primitive need to glorify the star. Legend produced the reaction from the crowd that one would expect for Christ. Legend has received mixed reviews, but in person, all I saw was a Christ-like vocal God. I was only privy to Legends’ smooth and delicious voice, which although sometimes faltered but never failed to impress the hoard of adoring fans that I had become a part of.

john legend

Despite Legend’s larger than life character, Brandon Victor Dixon stole the show and the hearts of the audience as Judas. The Broadway veteran rocked the same trendy dark and slightly sinister-like clothes as the ensemble as he belted out some soulfully moving and powerful numbers. He comfortably reached vocal heights that Legend struggled to project. Dixon let his inner rock star shine, he was clearly moved by the audience that was cheering along any vocal riffs and challenging vocal pieces. Dixon carried the brunt of the story and played a huge narrative role in this revival of Christ’s story.

brandon-victor-dixon-heaven-jesus-christ-superstar-live.jpg

Watching the show from the crowd distorted the story significantly, there wasn’t a storyline, rather a collection of intensely emotional songs. Instead of living through the last days of Christ, I found myself jumping up and down at a rock concert that ended with the Star floating away. The tall heads in front of me and the overbearing cheers and screams from my peers meant that the brilliant vocals were often drowned out. Although our adoration moved the cast to perform with greater gusto, the best place for an audience member to be was at home on the couch. Luckily NBC has made Jesus Christ Super Star Live readily available to those who live in the US.

As the announcement comes that there will be a national tour of JCSS, it dawns on me that although this was a delightful piece of artistic creation, the money aspect of this live production, and the widespread viewing of the Easter show, was a very purposeful decision. It will soon be possible for those of you living in the US to soon see Jesus and Judas fighting it out live. Until then please enjoy this fabulous gift NBC has given us.

Watch Jesus Christ Superstar Live Now- https://www.nbc.com/jesus-christ-superstar/video/jesus-christ-superstar-live-in-concert/3689643

Buy Tickets for Jesus Christ Superstar Soon- https://www.ticketmaster.com/Jesus-Christ-Superstar-tickets/artist/843994?list_view=1

 

 

 

 

 

REVIEW: V For Victory @ Stockwell Playhouse

Reviewed by Kayleigh Place

V for Victory starts off set in the 1940s just after the war starts between Britain and Germany and is about how the Nazis took over Jersey. I have never seen the film, read the book or watched the musical, I knew nothing about what this rendition was going to entail.

The programme took the form of a ration book which I thought was a nice touch and had a summary of the musical’s premise. I learnt upon arrival that it was the in-concert version of the musical so all emphasis was on the songs. When I entered the theatre, there was a very atmospheric 1940s scene already on stage.

The staging was fantastic, the use of the wooden crates for each scene and the transition of moving them about the stage was hardly noticeable and was conducted very fluidly.

 

They start with the open song which I cringed and flinched at as one of the actors, I believe it was Klemens Koehring, was completely off key and out of tune with the rest of the cast, I hoped that it would not be like that the whole way through! Luckily his solo was beautiful, as was the rest of his performance. I am therefore putting this down to not warming his vocal cords up properly before the show.

However, there was another song that had the same effect; Leanne Coupland, who played Judy, when she sang her solo I nearly put my fingers in my ears! Throughout there was the one note that she consistently missed and I noticed her voice wavering on some notes. It was less noticeable when the cast sang together but, being sat at the front, I could hear it rather well, unfortunately.

I do have a good point to say about the singing; the duet between Georgina Rose Hanson (Liz Edward) and Ben Eagle (Bailiff Edwards) was fantastic! The song was so intense with the overlapping lines and the cues which were so well timed, I would go back just to hear them sing it again!

Considering there was not a lot of dialogue, you could tell there was a lot cut out, everything still flowed nicely. You could see the love story between Thomas and Liz, Liz’s anger at her dad for not standing up to the Nazis for Jersey, how Captain Gunther Scheider was becoming to hate the Nazis and what they stood for because he joined the army to protect his country not enslave. I felt even though it was shortened I still managed to connect with each character, understand their backgrounds, thoughts and feelings.

One of the things the irritated me the most throughout were the costumes. They were great. The cast was dressed appropriately for the era the shoes, the stockings, the hats, the braces, everything was well thought about. But they clearly forgot their IRON! All the guy’s shirts were creased from the beginning and the girls’ dresses looking like they had been retrieved from a bag stuffed with clothes to go to a charity shop! The Captain’s Nazi jacket, although one of the items that wasn’t creased, it did not fit him correctly. You could tell that it was way too big and it looked like a child wearing his dad’s suit jacket!

The acting was spectacular especially from Aaron Bannister-Davis who played the main character, Thomas Carter. The emotion and the facial expressions he used felt like it was real life and at times I almost forgot that I was sat in a theatre. It felt as though I was his friend and I was there to help him through his pain and to stand by his side as he rose up against the Nazis to take our homeland back.

Overall the show itself was great, but there is a lot of room for improvement. I would happily see this again if I could be confident that the quality of the singing had improved. If you like historical musical and don’t mind the odd good song being ruined but are up for an emotional, heartfelt storytelling, I’d strongly recommend you see this.

3-stars